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Miscellany


 

 

 

Daniel Joseph Betsill, luthier, et al

djbetsill@bellsouth.net

Artist's Profile, UGA Website 2008

Artist's Statement

My Resume

Sunday, September 21, 2014

The Bolduc House cradle is complete! The only remaining piece to add is the actual hardware which we are having made by a blacksmith in Stone Mountain. I have painted black hardware-store hooks and eyes in place temporarily. I created a page for the project here.

To keep the finish 100% natural I'm using Van Dyke crystals (ground walnut husks) and a beeswax mixture I put together with turpentine and Rottenstone and some of the stain mixed in. This was such a pleasant experience making my own finishes and not having noxious fumes that I think I will start using this finish on my instruments.

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Sunday, September 7, 2014

Much mortise and tennoning later the frame is assembled on the cradle project. We're one month away from baby arrival!

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Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Progress on the Bolduc House Cradle. The original appears to have some sort of tack securring each intersection on the basket. The original probably had its rails mortised to slide the staves through, unlike my version that has the rails built up out of pieces (the laminations also visible in this shot before I cleaned them up). So my tack is doing double duty by keeping the stave from sliding out but I'm using a brass tack that's just a little longer than the assembly so I can crimp it down on the inside face to ensure that the pieces never pull apart. The head embedded on the outside face makes a nice detail. God is in the details.

If French colonials had tightbond and 3" drywall screws, would they use them? I think yes.

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Saturday, August 2, 2014

Progress on the Bolduc House Cradle. Test fitting the ribs to the rails.

The continuing story of my un-treadle lathe. This time I've had to clamp the tailstock outside the bed to get the 42" length I need for this piece.

Beginning to turn the posts of the frame. Kind of an unfortunate place for a knot. I could go back to the lumber store and get another piece. But if I was doing this in the wilderness of pre-Louisiana Purchase colonial France I would probably not want to go out and cut down another tree. We'll call this a beauty mark.

While cutting strips for the fillets of the cradle basket I came across some insect holes that were perfectly spaced apart. Carpenter ants?

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Saturday, July 26, 2014

Progress on the Bolduc House Cradle. Each rail is mortised into the end panels

A layup of the ribs and rails

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Sunday, July 20, 2014

Progress on the Bolduc House Cradle. Both foot assemblies are now complete. This is a fit-up of the basket with two thin layers of quartersawn white oak making the hoops sandwiched between two rail pieces with a fillet.

Bending two strips of quartersawn oak over a form to make one of the ribs.

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Friday, July 18, 2014

The Arts and Crafts end tables are complete. Off to Missouri! See furniture page for project details

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Cutting the braces for the Arts and Crafts end tables. It's wasteful but I'm cutting the grain at a 45 for maximum strength.

One of the two tables is complete and 'in the white'

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Saturday, June 28, 2014

Turning the bun feet for the French colonial cradle. One down, three to go! Turning two at a time. I'll finish the head profile and do the final sanding after both are roughed out when I can worry less about deflection. I'll round the corners of the flats off the lathe.

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Wednesday, June 19, 2014

My drawing of a cradle found at the Bolduc House in St. Genevieve, Missouri. Below, a photo of the room in which the cradle resides.

Most of the original crib is white oak, however the posts are some kind of closed-grain wood like cherry. I found some 3" thick cherry at Carlton McClendon which had its own story: hand adz marks. Who knows how old this is or where it came from, but it's old.

Tweaking the shape of the end panels.

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Sunday, June 15, 2014

Progress on the Arts and Crafts end tables. The brackets are attached with biscuits.

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Saturday, June 7, 2014

Progress on the Arts and Crafts end tables. This shot doesn't look much different from the last one but more parts are finished and the first table is actually being glued up.

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Sunday, June 1, 2014

The Vargueno is complete.

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Monday,May 26, 2014

My new home office requires a desk. I finally have a reason to make one of these Spanish Renaissance chest-desks. The front panel folds down to be the writing surface and interior is usually filled with a warren of highly decorated drawers. My interior will be open to fill with monitor and tower. The base is greatly simplified, opposed to the barley twist turnings and carvings of the originals. This is another one of my patented 2x4-made-in-a-day projects.

The rails of the base are profiled and tapped for dowels that will hold the columns in place.

Shortcut tip: drill out the corners of the mortise to help prevent splits when chiseling the mortise square.

The base getting a test fit before glue-up. each tenon will be pinned with a 1/4" dowel

The down-and-dirty way to make a flat panel assembly: run the grooves on the table saw, stopping short of each end so as not to expose the cut on the ends, then using a biscuit. The joint can be further reinforced by tapping a small dowel through each end of the biscuit like a pinned tenon.

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Thursday,May 8, 2014

Beginning a sign for my Aunt's property in South Georgia. Inspired by 18th c. stagecoach tavern signs with a lettering style popular in the 1940's when the schoolhouse was built.

The main plate had a previous life as a a door I made out of butt-joined 2x6s. It was rustic, so I'm planing out the mis-aligned seams. The bottom rail is drawn out on a surfaced 2x6.

Bondo: the woodworker's friend. Seams and tearout are are filled. I'm taking every precaution to make it weatherproof. There's a reason signs these days are made out of plastic.

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Sunday,May 4, 2014

A general view of work on two Arts-and -Crafts bedside tables for my friends Billy and Cecillia. They have to be finished before the baby arrives. I don't know how I'm going to get these to St. Louis.

A better picture of the candle stand, AKA Shannon's bedside table.

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Sunday, April 27, 2014

Work on the candlestand is complete. Two atmospheric evening shots in-situ. The top box wound up being taller which made the legs shorter than drawn to keep the piece at 30". And I went with the turtle instead of the bird.

Fitting the dovetalis. Ryobi product placement.

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Tuesday,April 22, 2014

A Williamsburg-inspired candle stand in progress. David Byrne looks on.

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Saturday, March 15, 2014

A spalted sweetgum bowl. One of a pair made from a client's homesite in Serenbe, Georgia.

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Monday, March 3, 2014

An end table design with arts-and-crafts and chinese mashup style.

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Monday, February 3, 2014

Turning a coat rack base. See furniture page for more process photos

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Monday, January 27, 2014

The Kay Kraft is "restored". I'll call this a refurbishment since the aim was not to take it back to factory but celebrate the years of use and make it playable again. I'm still going to replace the missing bits of purfling on the soundhole and horn. Hanging with my Kay Kraft mandolin.

My pickguard is mahogany but ebonized and then rubbed out a bit. Hides the worst of the damage easily.

The frets were so badly indented on the second string 1st and 3rd position that the recrowning didn't help. But this shot shows an experiment filling in the indentation with superglue. Worked pretty good. Sure beats pulling the frets. Looks so natural, only my luthier knows!

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Thursday, January 23, 2014

New year's resolution: fix this Kay Kraft. I have had this instrument for 20 years. I saw a big ol' picutre of Patterson Hood from Drive-By-Truckers in this month's Garden and Gun sporting a Kay Kraft just like mine. . except his clearly is playable. Looks pretty cool! Wish I had one! Wait, I do have one. I got this for probably about $75 from Lark in the Morning when I was in college just on sight of the tiny black and white picture in their catalog. Never seen a body shape like that before. Had to have it. It was listed in 'fair' condition. What it had was a completely shot fingerboard, a freaking BULLET hole and a hack wood-putty patch job. On top of that the top was worn through TO THE LININGS on about 2 inches of the upper bout. I discovered this only after peeling back about ten layers of dark varnish. Long story short, it went on the wall.

It was missing most of the fretboard binding which I replaced easily enough and am now - 20 years later - trimming. This shot also shows the sorry state of the frets. I think I'm going to leave the finger grooves in the rosewood and just recrown the frets. That wood is so brittle that pulling the frets I might as well replace the entire fingerboard. It's worth trying to keep for the playing history and historic frets.

The body. . .well. . .not attractive. There was a time when I though, my God, how am I going to cut out that damage and patch in a new square? It appears stable though - thanks to all the gloop inside the body - so I think a nice big pick guard is what is needed here. I may even leave the partial stripping look to tell the story. Just need to replace that soundhole binding. Note wing nut and sliding dovetail neck attachment that facilitated easy neck angle adjustment on these instruments.

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Saturday, December 28, 2013

A couple of items finally photographed form earlier this year: a painting of Florence and a dining table for my Cousin's new house. Which is now 2 years old.

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Thursday, December 19, 2013

My first resonator banjo is complete. See this page for project log and scroll down to "From Start to Finish: A Bluegrass Banjo".

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Monday, December 16, 2013

Parts of the banjo are finished with a faded blonde shellac finish.

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Saturday, November 30, 2013

Trimming the peghead of the banjo with kinfe and files. See this page for project log.

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Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Turning the back of the bluegrass banjo. See this page for project log.

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Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Having to lower the rails on my un-treadle lathe to accommodate the 13" diameter backplate for the banjo commission.

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Tuesday, November 5, 2013

A set of Stockhausen slit drums ares complete.

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Monday, October 28, 2013

The tenor cittern is complete.

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Monday, October 7, 2013

Progress on the Stockhausen slit drums. The top plate is routed, shaped, then the slot sawn to create the two 'tongues'.

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Tuesday, September 24, 2013

The beginnings of a set of Stockhausen slit drums: planks of 4/4 sapele. The top board is planed.

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Sunday, September 22, 2013

Attaching the fingerboard of the tenor cittern.

Pegs in the making for the tenor cittern. I've learned to avoid tailstock pressure whenever possible. So I rough turn only between centers then cut the top waste off to hold the head end in a chuck while I turn the shaft, then flip it around to turn the head. Complicated, but less split pegs.

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Thursday, September 19, 2013

The lyre is complete. See this page for build log.

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Thursday, September 12, 2013

Fret dressing on the cittern in progress. The nearest fret is finished with a domed polish. The next frets still have a bur from leveling. On citterns, the lower the fret , the better the intonation. Especially when the fingerboard is not scalloped.

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Thursday, September 5, 2013

Beginning a commission for a closed-back banjo. See this page for build log. Scroll down to 'A Bluegrass Banjo'.

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Thursday, August 29, 2013

Progress on the Sutton Hoo lyre. See this page for build log

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Thursday, August 15, 2013

Where cittern fretboards come from: a block of Swiss Pearwood.

I've finally made a little miter box for my fretwork.

The tenor cittern has the top on and the fretgoard is resting in place, fretting in progress.

The lyre yoke is attached and trimmed. A block of wood awaits to be turned into a bridge

Attaching the facing pieces to the yoke in plane with the soundboard

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The table spars are attached to the tenor cittern. This is the highest tension I have put on one of these instruments: an octave mandolin tuning in 5ths, so these are some beefy bars.

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Monday, August 5, 2013

I bought this tool to draw entasis on column shafts for my day job. But it works great for cittern brace arch drawing too!

The lyre gets the yoke attached with a slotted joint. The cut of the wood is not very attractive so I think I'm going to laminate some quartersawn facing in the opposite direction in the same plane as the soundboard grain.

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013

The DeGive dulcimer fretboard is glued to the top with staple frets in place.

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Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Work in progress: The lyre is ready to have the yoke attached; The tenor cittern has the top rough cut and is waiting on the top spar to be shaped and set in place; The DeGive dulcimer is ready for its top and fretboard.

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Sunday, July 21, 2013

The current DeGive Dulcimer: a detail of the end block showing a couple of vestigial nail holes.

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Thursday, July 4, 2013

Work commences on my replica of the Sutton Hoo Lyre, made from the DeGive House wood. See this page for build log.

The neck and back are attached to the rib and I can do the final shaping of the heel of the tenor cittern. This shot helps to show the scale of the instrument against the baroque guitar body to the right. The baroque guitar body which will someday be an instrument but for the past five years has been a filing cabinet.

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Tuesday, July 2,2013

Carving the heel of the tenor cittern

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Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Heaven's Door is back in my workshop to correct some damage done by the great GSU Music School Flood of 2011 and I'm taking the opportunity to revisit the panel hanging method. This is now the third iteration of the system to hold the heavy plates at the nodes without dampening the resonance. The first method was with swaged wire rope that proved to be overengineered and warped the frame when the instrument contracted in a dry interior. The second method was a less elegant tensioned fiber rope setup which was difficult to adjust and relied on twine to hold the plates back to the frame at each seam. This new idea is much simpler, with sticks running along the nodes of the plates and screws tapped through them directly into the plates. The Door has really come full circle; because the original German Door used bolts at the back of the plates to hold them to the frame. The German design, however, fixed the bolts at the four corners of the plates and ignored the acoustic advantage of holding the plate at the fundamental node. My fix points tap into dowels, which I filled in at the previous rope holes at the node locations. Just two screws set about 2 1/2" down from the top of each plate lets them 'hang' and resonate freely, separated from the stick by felt pads. This system means no tensioning of a 'through rope' and holds the plates in place without the need for adjustment. If only I had thought of this in 2005.

Don't cross the streams, Ray! ! ! On a cittern it's possible to have a continuous rib rather than two that's typical on a guitar. The disadvantage is you wind up having to warp it in the process. Which then gets creativly corrected. Venkman, shorten your stream, I don't want my face burned off. See this page for more images

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Saturday, June 22, 2013

Laying up the cherry and maple staves of the back of the tenor cittern.

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Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Work on a tenor cittern commences. I'm making the neck shorter for an octave mandolin tuning.

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Sunday, June 2, 2013

A celtic mandola I slipped in for myself between commissions. It's walnut with Brazilian rosewood fingerboard and peghead veneer. I wanted an instrument that would be at home in the 19th c. so I used friction pegs and brass frets.

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Saturday, May 25, 2013

The symphonia is complete! See here for project log.

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Saturday, March 16, 2013

A day off for bowlturning. See here for project log and scroll down to 'A Beechwood Bowl.'

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Progress on the symphonia. See here for project log.

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Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Some recent activity with Stockhausen's Heaven's Door. See the Instruments page for project description. The Door was set to be performed at Lincoln Center in NYC yesterday, but unfortunatly Hurricane Sandy put the skids on and the door is headed back to Atlanta unplayed. A reschedule is in the works. In the mean time, WABE did this article on the piece:

WABE on City Cafe and a corresponding Georgia State Article

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Saturday, July 21, 2012

I am beginning my research on the 16th c. vihuela de mano for a commission. I've always wanted to make one of these instruments, having danced around them chronologically with my study of the pre-renaissance vielles, the chitarra battente and the baroque guitar. On the page I have created I will compile my research of the three surviving documented examples, a survey of the iconography and of the revival instruments. Click here.

 

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Workshop in a closet.

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Online Chap Book:

 

 

 

 

And did the Countenance Divine
Shine forth upon our clouded hills?
And was Jerusalem builded here
Among these dark Satanic mills?

-William Blake

 

 

Leaf and branch, water and stone: they have the hue and beauty of all these things under the twilight of Lorien that we love; for we put the thought of all that we love into all that we make.

- J.R.R Tolkien, from the Lord of the Rings

 

Live with the gods. And he does live with the gods who constantly shows to them that his own soul is satisfied with its daimon, that portion of himself that Zeus has given to every man to be his guardian and guide and that his soul does all that the daimon wishes. And this is every man's understanding and reason.

-Marcus Aurelius

 

 

 

And there the sunset skies unseal’d, Like lands he never knew, /Beyond to-morrow’s battle-field /Lay open out of view /To ride into.

-D.G. Rossetti, from The Staff and Script

 

 

 

 


Let Athene dwell in the cities she's founded. For me, the woodlands.

-Virgil

 

 

Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife,/ Their sober wishes never learn'd to stray;
Along the cool sequester'd vale of life/ They kept the noiseless tenor of their way.

-from Thomas Gray's "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard"

 

 

He slept thus until late morning, while the pillows arranged themselves into a large flat plain on which his now quieter sleep would wander. On these white roads, he slowly returned to his senses, to daylight, to reality - and at last he opened his eyes as does a sleeping passenger when the train stops at a station.

-Bruno Schultz, from The Cinnamon Shops

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deus Mysterium tremendum et fascinans.

-Rudolph Otto

 

 

 

Are you angry with him whose armpits stink? Are you angry with him whose mouth smells foul? What good does this anger do you? He has such a mouth, he has such armpits: it is necessary that such an emination must come from such things. But the man has reason, it will be said, and he is able, if he takes pains, to discover wherein he offends. . .there is no need of anger, the stuff of tragic actors and whores.

-Marcus Aurelius

 

 

 

 

Green aisles of Pullman cars/ Soothe me like trees/ Woven in old tapestries/ I love to watch the stars/ Remote above the earth/ In watery light,/ while in the lower berth./ I whirl through the night.

-William Rose Benet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With faith, discipline and selfless devotion to duty, there is nothing worthwhile that you cannot achieve.

-Jinnah

 

 

The full streams feed on flower of rushes, /Ripe grasses trammel a traveling foot, /The faint fresh flame of the young year flushes/
From leaf to flower and flower to fruit;/And fruit and leaf are as gold and fire,/And the oat is heard above the lyre, /And the hoofèd heel of a satyr crushes /The chestnut husk at the chestnut root.

-Swinburne

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both music and dance are voices of the way.

-Zenji Hakuin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The richest of men is not more fortunate than he that has enough for the day, unless his good fortune attend him to the grave and he finish his life in honour. Many wealthy men are fortunate, whilst many of only moderate riches are blessed by fortune. The wealthier but less fortunate man is indeed better furnished with means to gratify his passions and to bear the blow of a great calamity. But if the other is less able to do these two things, his happy life saves him from the need to do them.

-Solon to Croesus, Herodotus (I, 32)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the dulcimer rhimes are grace place and the like.

-Christopher Smart